Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Don’t Quit Now! Keep Your Kid Motivated for Music Lessons


Few things are more frustrating than investing your time and money in an instrument and lessons for your child only to hear weeks later that they’ve changed their mind and don’t want to continue. Although you’re frustrated and you want your kid to get the many advantages that music lessons have to offer, you also don’t want to turn your home into a battleground. What’s a parent to do?

If your child tells you that they don’t want to continue with music lessons or if you sense that their motivation is slipping, you can take action. Read on to find out what you can do to keep your kid committed to learning music!

Ask Why, and Really Listen 
The most important thing you can do is really listen to what’s happening in your child’s life that is making them want to quit. Do they feel shy or insecure about learning something new? Are they frustrated because learning music is more work than they thought? Let your child know that it’s totally normal to feel nervous about trying a new activity and learning takes time. Share with them a time when you felt nervous or frustrated with something but you persevered and eventually succeeded.

Put it on the Calendar 
Sit down with a calendar and write down all of your child’s activities. If the calendar starts to look more like it belongs to a busy executive than a third grader, your kid is probably feeling overwhelmed and over-scheduled! If music is important to your child but stress is making them want to quit to get some free time, look at other activities and see if there is anything else that can be cut out.

Talk to their Teacher 
Everybody has different inherent strengths that come into play when learning music. Maybe your child is frustrated with the piano because they’re a natural drummer or a shy singer who would love to pick up a guitar. Talk with your child’s teacher to see what their honest feedback is about your child’s musical strengths and weaknesses. Switching instruments or going from an instrument to vocal lessons (or vice versa!) can help keep your kid involved in music in a way that is better suited to their learning style and personality.

Try a Different Method
If your child is having a hard time with the pacing of group music lessons, get him or her involved in private, one-on-one music lessons. Ask your child how they feel about their teacher. If their teacher’s approach or personality isn’t the best fit for helping your child succeed, don’t feel bad about trying out lessons with a different instructor!

Set a Goal 
Whether it’s learning a favorite song or preparing for a performance, help your child pick a goal and show them how continuing lessons will help them reach it. When kids see that their hard work and practice is going toward a tangible achievement, they usually feel more excited and determined to continue.

TakeLessons connects students with music teachers, performing arts instructors, and academic tutors, ensuring a fun, safe, and rewarding lesson experience. Visit TakeLessons to learn more about private lessons or search for a teacher near you!

30 comments:

michedt said...

I know when I was a child, I truly enjoyed music lessons. However, another thing to think about is that perhaps the child really isn't musically inclined, and then you possibly are wasting money. I think really listening to them and understanding why they don't want to continue is very important.
Michelle Tucker

Jenna Wood said...

We have an 11 year old who just started flute this month (after much begging on her part). She gets frustrated because she is being expected to learn how to read sheet music, these great tips will help!

Cheap Is The *New* Classy said...

Music is so important! I have always made sure that it was a big part of my daughter's life. I even made my entire living in the radio industry for about 8 years. :D

Tara Carlson said...

I was actually the kid who paid for piano lessons out of her own pocket, but had to quit due to not having a way to practice at home. I wish I could get my kids interested in music since it was/is so important to me, but they're more interested in visual arts.

Jessica B. said...

These are all great tips. I also feel it is very important to have music in your life. I hope my son will take lessons when he gets old enough. jj250@aol.com

HungryLittleGirl said...

My son played the flute but wanted to stop when he turned 9. He rather wanted to take Karate lessons. I think music is super important, but I can't force him :(

Melinda said...

I loved lessons, but I hated practicing. Practicing just wasn't fun for me.

Tatiana Diaz said...

These are great tips. I wish I had taken music lessons as a child, it is something I am definitely still in to.

MikiHope said...

We were forced to learn to play a musical instrument when I was in school----I finally chose the recorder (I think I still have it gathering dust somewhere) which I never really learned. I think the teacher back then must have told my parents I had little to no affinity for playing instruments cause they didn't force the issue and gladly took the cotton out of their ears (no headphones back then)

(Terry) My Journey With Candida said...

I don't have a musical bone in my body but as a child, I always wanted to play the piano. No one in my family plays any kind of a instrument, nor do they sing, unless you consider singing in the shower or alone in the car singing.

ericksonandco.com said...

Great tips! I don't remember what my mom used to do to keep us motivated.... I remember she used to tell us two things over and over 1. You'll thank of when I'm older and 2. You can't go play with your friends until you practice. I think someone should have patted my mom on the back with all the stuff she put up with from us kids and our music lessons haha.

Rachee said...

My kid takes piano lessons and at times it is a struggle to keep her practicing! So far the struggle has been minimal but I'll keep this post available for some tips.

brianemmel said...

I am a small private music school owner(www.grandstaffmusicschool.com),
I post in my monthly newsletter to my students parents advice to have my student learn a song and perform it for the parent/s. This helps me as some of my younger students are not aware of songs/artists/bands that are out there and it gets the parents involved!

brianemmel said...

I am a small private music school owner(www.grandstaffmusicschool.com),
I post in my monthly newsletter to my students parents advice to have my student learn a song and perform it for the parent/s. This helps me as some of my younger students are not aware of songs/artists/bands that are out there and it gets the parents involved!

Lena B said...

That is so true - I had my ups and down, but I am happy I stuck with it

Healy Harpster said...

My girl is six years old and she likes music. I am considering of enrolling her to a music class in the future. Thanks for the tips as I may get a use of it whenever she change her mind.

kristenione said...

This is such a great post. Music for me was a way to come out of my shell and it teaches hard work and discipline. These are great tips that could be applied to many parenting challenges!

mail4rosey said...

Two of my four children took music lessons for years and it was a very fundamental part of their childhood. This is a good message to share.

Dov Shapira said...

Sounds very important to me.
No one in my family ever too music lessons or had any abilities there.
But we all love music.

Slap Dash Kids said...

I love the tip to ask why and REALLY listen. So many parents will ask why and dismiss their child's answer or not listen at all.

Bobbi Burleson said...

Both of my kids did this. My son begged for a guitar and then quit in less than a year. My daughter wanted piano lessons and a electric keyboard to practice on at home. I fought her quitting harder because it was much more expensive than the guitar. I wish I had known how to handle it then.

Tough Cookie Mommy said...

As an educator, I completely understand the importance that music programs have in the lives of students. Studies show that kids who have music as part of their activities, do better overall academically. Thanks for bringing attention to this cause.

Melanie said...

Love how you keep your kids motivated to keep going; Music is soo important and as a great side effect they also learn to stick with something after they start it.. LOVE your post, thanks for sharing

Growing Up Madison said...

My toddler loves music. I bought her a little piano before she turned a year old and she sits at it and plays almost every day. I can't wait to sign her up for piano lessons.

Melanie S said...

my kids are too little right now but when they are older we def want to enroll them in creative classes like music and such.

Michelle H said...

I always loved my music lessons and know my oldest will excel at them. Music is really important to me so I'll have to remember these tips for other of my kids who might not take to it as easily.

Amanda McMahon said...

i was in band back in high school (and college), but am thinking of having my daughter do some formal lessons in ukelele - then to guitar. i wanted violin but it is expensive (more than double the cost, and lessons are 15 minute shorter!) and the violin alone is an investment if she doens't like it. she is 5

Cynthia Landrie said...

I never played and instrument, but alwasy wanted to play the piano. I have many friends who's children play various instruments and I know they follow a very regular schedule.

Fan R. said...

Music requires everyday practice, sometimes it is difficult to follow this rule, especially for kids. I am glad my parents forced me to practice otherwise I did not learn anything.

Fan R @TeddyOutReady

Kristyn said...

my daughter loves music and wants to take lessons! we recently moved and need to find a good place for her to get lessons at



Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...